OPERATIONALIZING STRATEGY

OPERATIONALIZING STRATEGY
All strategy can be simplified into the three questions: Where am I now? Where do I want to be? How do I get there? The questions are easy. The answers however are very complex giving rise to lots of theories, business models and books.
Ask 10 people where they are and despite being in the same place they may well give different answers:  in a room, in a building, on a street, in a town, the sheer number of ways that the question could be answered is thought provoking. Ask them where they want to be and the range of possible answers becomes infinite.
Imagine therefore how difficult it must be to gain consensus on where you are in the context of something intangible. Where are you in people’s thinking? Where are you in market expectation? Opinion polls struggle to answer this and for a Leader seeking to create consensus on position, plan and progress this is a challenge. Is this why the current period is being described as post-truth (fact-free) period of politics and change?
“Where am I now”  Isn’t as simple as No9 product in the UK market
It is increasingly a statement of values and beliefs rather than position.
“Where do I want to be” Isn’t as simple as Be the No1 product in the UK market
It is increasingly a statement of hope and opportunity rather than a place.
“How do I get there” Isn’t as simple as Cut costs, rationalize distribution and grow market share.
It is increasingly a statement about attitude and perception rather than physical changes.
In each case there is a need to curate the messages and meaning that motivate and direct energy, but also a corresponding need to ensure that the energy is being focused on the Critical Success Factors that make a difference.
It could be said that Operationalizing Strategy demands a unique blend of leadership and management. It is often said that leadership is about doing the right things, whereas management is about doing things right.
Often Leadership comes out on top as being the more important. However following big changes which will come from Trump and Brexit you may be wishing for a balance between rhetoric and fact, vision and implementation.
Vision without action is merely a dream. Action without vision just passes the time. Vision with action can change the world.( Joel A. Barker)
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Ports of Jersey and Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, and  a past curator for TEDx (TEDTalks)
Web: http://www. AdaptConsultingCompany.com
Twitter: @AdaptCCompany


Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

The value of project leadership over project management

A SIMPLISTIC VIEW OF A PROJECT MANAGER

Arguably a Project Manager with a good Sponsor and necessary resources can “..do exactly what is says on the tin..” and following an effective project management methodology can deliver on-time, on-budget and to-specification.

The problem is that project management seldom has a clear scope, a committed Sponsor and all necessary resources. In such cases all a Project Manager can do is report problems, but not offer any analysis, diagnosis or decision often leaving this to the Project Board. This is a problem if the Project Board do not have the expertise or experience for tackling these issues.

A PROJECT LEADER

A Project Leader is someone who can translate the ambitions of an organization into aims and tasks with deliverables and some clarity of the challenges and needs.  They work in partnership with the Project Board, sharing some of the responsibility for steering the project and ensuring delivery.

This goes way beyond simplistic reporting of tasks, risks and actions.

THE ROLE OF A LEADER

I am going to pick one very narrow quote that serves my purpose.

The way in which Sir Dave Brailsford always saw his role at British Cycling was as the conductor of an orchestra. He was not the manager barking orders, nor was he the coach imparting technical wisdom. In his role as performance director, he was a leader who created a finely-tuned environment in which athletes, coaches, sports scientists and the rest could go about the pursuit of excellence in perfect harmony.

Source: http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/sport/cycling/article4061381.ece

Extending the orchestral theme Sir Dave also said he would never ‘…snatch the violin from someone and show them how to play it…’ since a) he cannot perform better than his team and b) this would undermine the team-member.

THE ABILITY TO STEP-UP OR STEP-DOWN

I agree that it is undermining for a Project Leader to tell people how to do their job, and compromises responsibility, accountability and ownership.

But it is important for the Project Leader to understand the people, task and challenges to be able to support or indeed step-in if necessary: possibly adopting one of 6 leadership styles appropriate to the person, task or challenge.

Commanding – someone who demands immediate compliance.
Visionary – someone who mobilizes people towards their vision.
Affiliative – someone who creates harmony and builds emotional bonds.
Democratic – someone who forges consensus through collective and fair participation.
Pace-setting – someone who sets their own high standards for performance, and expects their team to match them.
Coaching – someone who develops people for the future through nurturing and training.

See https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/emotional-leadership.htm

SPECTATOR OR PARTICIPANT

Your Project Manager should not be a spectator and their agendas, minutes, papers and reports should not amount to an evidence trail or witness statement.  Whilst there is merit in impartial, objective independence that should not extend to passively watching a crash.

A Project Leader should be a participant, possibly even a partner who is active and concerned with delivery on-time, on-budget and to-specification and ideally keeping risk-low and communication-high throughout.

A good Project Leader will know when to nag or nudge for action, and when it is necessary to step in to avoid problems or safeguard the project aims and objectives.

Returning to the Sir Dave Brailsford’s Orchestra – whilst it would be madness to try and both play the instruments and conduct the music would is it wrong if they were a pianist and passively stood in front of a vacant piano?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.

Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

The importance of data ownership, sharing, confidentiality, decisions in eHealth

THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA

One of the key challenges to integrated health care, and eHealth is data: data ownership, data sharing, data confidentiality and data for collaborative decisions over funding and clinical outcomes.
Given the importance of data to health and social care providers you’d think in an Island as small as Jersey they would have coordinated and compatible systems but the challenges in Jersey are just the same as many bigger jurisdictions.

DATA TO IMPROVE OUTCOMES

Having attended a number of UK based Health Events and Conferences I increasingly believe that better co-ordination, collaboration, co-operation through shared data will create transparency and trust within Health and Social Care Services and improve both clinical outcomes and value for money.

Consider the implications, opportunities and benefits in these scenarios
A Police officer knows about the mental health of someone before they attend a premises
The accident and emergency department has access to GP records when attending to someone
There is shared-data between Primary Care and Secondary Care to help service delivery
There are many more that I could add.

AN INVITATION TO SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING ELSEWHERE

On the 11th & 12th of August EMIS Health (Primary and Community system suppliers) will be hosting Health related workshops at Digital Jersey and one of the subjects is “Data Sharing” This may be of interest so below are the times and content which we are repeating over 2 days. Please pass this anyone you feel is relevant.
11th August  12:00 –  13:30
12th August  0800 –   09:30

The content will be repeated for those that cannot make either one of the sessions.
•         Care Record sharing
•         Cross Organisation Appointments
•         Cross Organisation Tasks
•         Managed Referrals
•         Document Sharing

Existing models of Sharing
•         Liverpool
•         Bristol

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organization I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.

Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

HOW TO DIRECT AND GROW A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS

 

Start-up businesses aim to grow from entrepreneurial chaos to scalable success, but how do they do this?
THE PHASES OF GROWTH
Most businesses that start small evolve according to need, personality, passion and interests rather than  any obvious planned structure.  As they become larger it becomes necessary to have some structure around roles, responsibilities and specialisms to avoid error, omission, duplication and confusion.
The early start-up may be directed by the entrepreneur, then as people join it may become collaborative or co-operative, and then possibly more delegated, trusting good people to manage the tasks and allowing the boss(es) to focus on customers and strategy.
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
These phases require a change in people, process, management and leaderships skills and styles as the business grows. What works well with three people across the kitchen table may not be so workable with 10 people in an office or 20 across 2 locations.
With this in mind it may seem obvious that the starting point should be the development of your people since it is them that promote the product and communicate with the customer. Without the right people and appropriate style of direction, coaching or delegation the business may not achieve its potential.
An organizational development approach however can be time-consuming. It is much harder and takes longer to learn to drive a car than it does to be a passenger and receive a lift. Often the role of a consultant becomes that of a taxi (getting the organization from A to B) rather than as a driving instructor (giving the skills, insight and experience for the organization from A to wherever it wants)
LEADERSHIP STYLES
There is some dispute about exactly how many leadership styles there are out there, but psychologist Daniel Goleman presents a good case for his six. They are:
Commanding – Someone who demands immediate compliance.
Visionary – Someone who mobilizes people towards their vision.
Affiliative – Someone who creates harmony and builds emotional bonds.
Democratic – Someone who forges consensus through collective and fair participation.
Pace-setting – Someone who sets their own high standards for performance, and expects their team to match them.
Coaching – Someone who develops people for the future through nurturing and training.
In this latter scenario there is a danger of not having a practical outcome in mind, building skills but without an objective output and outcomes. So how do we avoid this?
LESSON NO1 THE NUMBERS SET THE TOPIC FOR A STORY
Look at the Key Performance Indicators of the business: Whether it is sales, income, profitability or an analysis of time and productivity. Use objective facts to direct effort, and attention.
LESSON NO2 THE PEOPLE TELL THE STORY
Use the Key Performance Indicators as the context for discussion, or indeed perhaps make the discussion about identifying, agreement and measuring the most appropriate Key Performance Indicators. This will help understanding, engagement and responsibility.  Later when it comes to monitoring and management Key Performance Indicators the prior discussion will help ownership and accountability, and ultimately commitment and delivery.
LESSON NO3 THE PAST IS A TRUER TEST OF THE FUTURE
Avoid forecasts. I often hear people make a projection on what might happen. Or a future commitment about what people will achieve. The problem is that this prediction is a future-bet with no history or track-record. Look instead to past performance, data from the management information systems, the account systems as well as external market information. 
LESSON NO4 BEFORE CLIMBING A LADDER HAVE SOLID FOUNDATIONS
As an extension of the previous point, start small and grow. Don’t seek to pursue too many objectives at once. You risk scattering resources (including time, effort and money) confusion of staff and customers ultimately failure to succeed at one thing because you’ve been pursing many.
CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organization I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.


Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

THE CHOICE OF MESSENGER IS AS IMPORTANT AS THE MESSAGE

THE CHOICE OF MESSENGER IS AS IMPORTANT AS THE MESSAGE

MANAGING STAKEHOLDERS

Much has been written about stakeholders. The most frequently used model is to group stakeholders according to Power/Influence with those with Power + Influence being carefully engaged and those without Power + Influence being a lesser priority.

If you are unfamiliar with Power/Influence matrix read this blog…
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141209102103-26759263-stakeholders-analysis-power-influence-interest-matrix

I would like to explore a different approach, notably with a view toward what is said and how we say it based on two other models, the first is the DISC model and the second the 7 key influence methods.

In summary DISC suggests that people broadly fall into the following personality categories ..

RED (Dominant) Task/Outgoing: Dominant, Driven, Decisive
GREEN (Influencer) People/Outgoing: Persuasive, Optimistic, Creative
BLUE (Stable) People/Reserved: Caring, Supportive, Calm, Patient
YELLOW (Cautious) Task/Reserved: Cautious, Data-Orientated, Persistent, Analytic

If you are unfamiliar with DISC model read this blog…
https://www.discprofile.com/what-is-disc/overview/

It is useful when working with stakeholders to think about what are their “hot topics”: What do they worry about; What they care about; What do they frequently talk about.

Then, using DISC start to think about how you might present information to them and using the 7 key influence methods think about how you might persuade them.

Do it…
1.    Because you like me, and you’re like me
2.    Do it to reciprocate, repay past or future debt or promise
3.    Do it because everyone else is doing it
4.    This offer is good for a limited time only
5.    Do it to be consistent, with past, with values, with type
6.    You can believe me, I’m an authority
7.    Do it or else (use sparingly!)

If you are unfamiliar with 7 key influence methods read this blog…
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/magnificent-7-ways-influence-avoid-react-tim-hj-rogers

The problem is that often people present too much data to people who want brief summaries [RED (Dominant)] or not enough data to people who want facts [YELLOW (Cautious)].  Similarly too much focus on task may be upsetting to people whose concern is people, or vice-versa.

Moreover there may be a wrong assumption that people are always motivated to do what everyone else is doing [Do it because everyone else is doing it] rather than because the expert think this is the right thing to do [You can believe me, I’m an authority]

I therefore strongly recommend that for big issues which are dependent upon stakeholder engagement it is really important to think about both DISC and the 7 key influence methods.

Time spend carefully understanding the “hot topics” and crafting the “key messages”  is time well spent and choosing the right method, style and timing of communication is key to making sure your efforts are rewarded.

Finally, and importantly, don’t always assume you should be the person doing the communication. People are often more influenced by their friends, family or professional colleagues. This suggests that exactly the same message will be received differently depending on who said it.

Understanding this is vitally important because success it is very often about dialogue through people and the choice of messenger is as important as the message.
   
CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organization I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.
Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

THE MAGNIFICENT 7 WAYS TO INFLUENCE, AVOID OR REACT

These are check-lists that I have developed from various sources, none is entirely original but I have found them useful and happy to share with others.

7 WAYS TO INFLUENCE

Do it…
1.    Because you like me, and you’re like me
2.    Do it to reciprocate, repay past or future debt or promise
3.    Do it because everyone else is doing it
4.    This offer is good for a limited time only
5.    Do it to be consistent, with past, with values, with type
6.    You can believe me, I’m an authority
7.    Do it or else

7 WAYS TO AVOID INFLUENCE

No, because…
1.    I like you, but I don’t like this proposal
2.    Is this a favour? Are you looking for something in return?
3.    Just because everyone else is doesn’t mean..
4.    If I don’t have time to think, I don’t have time to buy
5.    I need to think about what I want, and be consistent with that
6.    If I were you I might, but I’m not you
7.    Please explain the “or else” slowly so I fully understand

How to react to negative feedback (possibly bullying)
1.    Ask for time to think – it should force a pause or moment of silence.
2.    Think about what you want to happen – don’t fight back, think forward.
3.    Get the bully to stop yelling – “Please speak more slowly, I’d like to understand” or (if on the phone) say nothing until they ask “Are you still there?”
4.    What ever you do don’t explain – think forward, don’t justify, recriminate, excuse or offer explanation. They’re looking to exploit weaknesses (-) not strength (+)
5.    Ask “what would you like me to do?”. If so challenged they will ask you for something more acceptable than what they want. This is your exit opportunity.
6.    Don’t take criticism personally – attacks on your team, your work, your values, etc are not attacks on you. Although it is hard to resist “fight or flight”
7.    Learn from criticism – if you wait 24 hrs before answering criticism it will demonstrate maturity, reasonableness and you may learn something!

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organization I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.
Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

TO GROW OR STAY SMALL – LIFESTYLE BUSINESS V ENTREPRENEUR

INTRODUCTION

This blog is a reflection of having worked in businesses that were going to grow, sell and make millions, as well as having established my own business with more modest ambitions to provide great service at low cost. It is not to champion one over the other, but to compare and contrast whilst noting that a whole range of factors may influence your preference including age, circumstance, lifestyle, ambition and income demands as well as your product, service and customers.

LIFESTYLE BUSINESS

A lifestyle business is a business set up and run by its founders primarily with the aim of sustaining a particular level of income and no more; or to provide a foundation from which to enjoy a particular lifestyle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifestyle_business

ENTREPRENEUR

By contrast an entrepreneur has traditionally been defined as the process of designing, launching and running a new business, which typically begins as a small business, such as a startup company, offering a product, process or service for sale or hire. For the purpose of this blog an Entrepreneur is different from a lifestyle business only in so far as they aspire to grow the business either with a view living off the proceeds from selling it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrepreneurship

THE PROS AND CONS

Generally  a lifestyle business run by its founders is unlikely to have many staff, and may be modest in both client base and income. If the aim is simply to provide sufficient income to pursue other interests there is no motive (or need) to manage growth or all the extra-overheads associated with creating capacity and satisfying demand.

From a client perspective these businesses can be very efficient: there is no big sales, marketing, HR, or technology team all of whom add to the costs of the product or service without adding to the quality or outcome.

From a founder perspective close to 100% of the income goes directly to the founder, with minimal overhead and without the need to pursue additional work simply to fund the overhead.

An entrepreneur by contrast will have to work much harder to grow a business and provide the income to sustain that growth. The bigger the business the more that growth is overhead (sales, marketing, HR, technology) all taking from the income but not contributing to it.

The prize for such growth is questionable if the additional income is spent simply maintaining operations rather than paying a dividend to the founder for their efforts.

THE LIE THAT BIGGER IS BETTER

There is the idea that having a bigger business is better because you can delegate all the work, but in truth even if they are doing all the work you as founder will be doing all the co-ordination necessary to guide the ship and that may be harder and less satisfying them actually doing the work that yields the income.

From a client perspective there may be a feeling of safety in numbers; that doing business with a small business or one-man-firm is inherit more risky than doing business with a firm that employs more people.

The reality is that there is dependency on good people irrespective of whether they are the employer or the employee and arguably you are going to get more commitment from someone whose income comes directly from the client as a result of their performance than someone who can be ill, take holiday or have their attentions directed elsewhere or quit their job with no recourse for the client.

 RISK AND REWARD

The risk and reward does appear to favour the entrepreneur, however is we assume that a good one-man-firm earns £100k , divided by 220 working days in a year that’s £450/day.

By contrast if you employ 3 people doing billable  work (£90k) and employ a book-keeper (£30k) operating from a small office (£10k) with modest infrastructure  (£5k) you’ll find that you need to bring in £1068/day  to achieve exactly the same result.

These numbers are indicative only because the higher wages for good people and financial burden of admin and the time lost to admin and bureaucracy is likely to make this scenario even less tenable.

From a client perspective they are getting access to talent worth £30k salary, rather than the commitment of someone  valued at £100k [this pre-supposed that price is actually reflective of value, which is a whole debate within itself]

In this scenario both founder and client loose-out.

FEWER PEOPLE WANT TO BIG BUSINESS

Perhaps the biggest factor is the change in demographics, education, culture and expectations. Fewer people want to be “wage slaves” and more relish the opportunity to do their own thing, working collaboratively in dynamic environments.

Clients too increasingly favour employing people who are passionate about their product or service than those who simply sing the corporate song of somebody else’s  for as long as their being paid.

The industrial revolution which saw people flock to the cities to find work with the factory employers is now in reverse with tele-working and globalization persuading people that the time spend commuting and the cost of posh premises is simply not valued by the people doing the work, or the customers paying for it.

NETWORKS, CONSORTIUMS AND COLLABORATIONS

Instead we are seeing  Networks, Consortiums and Collaborations as being the replacement for corporate employment since these provide the breadth and depth of multi-disciplinary skills, and the social fabric for communication, innovation and collaborative working.

The great value of this is that good, strong and successful Networks, Consortiums and Collaborations with thrive and others will wane. The ebb and flow of new combinations for new projects and initiatives provides a more dynamic and innovative environment for rapid change without the encumbrances of juggernought business which simply cannot offer this depth of resource pool or flexibility.

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organization I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.
Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

POWER RESPONSIBILITY PASSIVE AGGRESSION AND COUPS

LEADERSHIP IS NOT THE SAME AS DEMOCRACY.

POWER RESPONSIBILITY PASSIVE AGGRESSION AND COUPS

It has been an interesting couple of weeks with Brexit, the changes for Conservatives and Labour and a whole load of other business, domestic and parish club and community issues which all seem to have the same ingredients but in different quantities.

BREXIT

I shall try to avoid getting drawn on either side or the decision, but am curious about the people, personalities, process and product of this experience. It seems that all the above (Power Responsibility Passive Aggression and Coups) had their place at some point in the proceedings.

I doubt I can add any value to the debate given the huge amount of expert and less-expert opinion floating around on social media. What I might venture to do is explore what might be learned from this for anyone seeking to pursue any form of communication and engagement for their business, domestic and parish club and community initiative.

Soundbites and slogans matter because people don’t have the time, energy or sometimes comprehension to really tackle the issues and form an opinion.

People follow other people more than they follow principles. The voice of the crowd and a desire to belong and to be part of a team, will almost always compromise personal opinion. This may be seen as a bad thing (too easily coerced) or a good thing (willing to compromise).

Good news (it will be fine) or bad news (we will be doomed) is irrelevant if you don’t trust or believe the messenger.

Likeability (are they like me) appears to matter more than credibility (are they any good) when choosing to believe the messenger or not.

In pursuit of simplicity (in an effort to persuade) we often deny the complexity and truth (which might dampen people’s conviction). This is great when getting a simple decision but problematic when implementing a complex change. The risk is that you’ll find favour for the simple stuff and loose support when it gets to the difficult stuff.

LEADERSHIP

Can you be a leader if you have no followers or lose them? Who are your important followers: those that execute your commands; those that elected you; or those whom you impact by your decisions?

This isn’t just about Conservatives and Labour. I see this in organisations and clubs. Does the CEO worry about their customers more than their colleagues? Does the Manager worry more about their Supporters or their Players?

You cannot satisfy all of the people all of the time. If you bend to everyone it seems to me you are not a leader. If you bend to nobody then you are most likely a dictator without any true leadership qualities.

I think leading with permission; leading with support and endorsement is the right balance since this demands both decision making but also diplomacy, democracy, and some humility.

LESSONS FOR POWER RESPONSIBILITY PASSIVE AGGRESSION AND COUPS

There are plenty of passive aggressive who will undermine and sabotage. These are people whose motive may be to destabilize and demoralise without the intellect or courage to offer up alternative plans or for themselves to take leadership. These are subversive bullies.

However it may be hard to discern these people from the iconoclast seeking to overthrow a tyrant or break the chains of oppression. If they don’t have the time, money, talent, or good fortune to be able to offer an alternative these people are victims and rebels.

The only true heroes straddle both the above: They may be without time, money, talent, or good fortune but they use passion and leadership to persuade. They may will seek to destabilize that which is wrong and offer up alternative plans for what is right.

If you encounter passive aggressive behaviour which seeks to destabilize and demoralise the change-management response would be to marginalise or remove. However if as a leader you listen to them and confer upon them some responsibility and accountability you become less of a tyrant and they become more a part of the solution.

It takes a very savvy leader to know what responsibility and accountability to confer upon someone else and how to make sure of responsibility and accountability, but ultimately this is likely to avoid the disruption and chaos of a coup or the distraction of fighting a rear-guard action in an effort to avoid a coup.

I love and often quote Harold Wilson: I’d rather have in in the tent p*ssing out than out of the tent p*ssing in.

This is much easier said than done, which is why to marginalise or remove dissent is the more usual action.

Leadership is not the same as Democracy.

I’m not sure which is better.

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organisation I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.

Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

WHAT IS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT?

This blog isn’t a sales pitch and does not offer a clear and unambiguous solution to all your performance management challenges. Instead it is a pick-n-mix of thoughts and experiences that may be useful and could be challenged – I welcome both debate and feedback, it’s where the learning really begins.

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

It is worth putting a little context to this blog. I am Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club, and I have a number of client projects where I need to deliver on-time, on-budget and to-specification. I am also an Ironman Triathlete with a pretty tough training programme and some ambitions towards some big competitions coming up.

All this screams A-type character attitude and behaviour and I can imagine provokes recoil from all the B-type characters who may feel this as a bit “full-on” and that life is not meant to be a competition.

So should we encourage and support people to develop and perform, and if so how should we do this in a manner that support all of any ability.

PERFORMANCE ANXIETY

One of the challenges about any assessment of performance is understanding where you are now, where you want to be and how to get there. I know many people who will look at their race results or their work-based outputs and say that they are doing a good job.

My challenge will be how do you know? What is your point of reference for what good looks like. The introverts may suggest that it is a feeling and the extroverts will suggest it is based on feedback.

As an athlete and a project manager I am used to the idea of measurement, and as someone who has also attended a Mindfulness Programme I would also suggest that you can “measure” happiness and contentment. It isn’t something that just happens, but like any relationship is something that requires understanding, compromise and effort. Honestly being Mindfulness requires practice!

Performance anxiety comes from a fear of judgement, either external judgement or internal assessment. The first step is to establish what you want to get better at and then create an environment which is nurturing and supportive rather than judgemental.

THE DIVISIONS CAUSED BY PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

Within the Jersey Rowing Club I had many people push-back on what they perceived as a programme for the Elite high-performers, but soon others expressed an interest in the nurturing and supportive approach that included workshops on nutrition, technique, strength and flexibility.

Without doubt performance management can create them and us, winners and losers. But it should not. Performance management should create opportunity in any direction: this may be faster and stronger, but there no reason it cannot be more fun, more relaxed, more satisfying, safer, more engaging.

PERFORMANCE IS A PROCESS NOT A RESULT
As a triathlete I remember a great quote by Tim Don as he crossed the line and was asked about how he felt about the result. He replied, the result does not matter, I am pleased with the performance. I did what I set out to achieve and I am getting better. I am happy with that.

This is very important: Results are about what everyone else does relative to you, and results are based on lots of things, some of which you can control and some of which you cannot. Performance however is something that is wholly within your control.

This is true in sport, work or life.

IT IS THE TAKING PART THAT COUNTS

You might not be a “winner” but there is nothing wrong with being a participant: its still a lot better than being a spectator. This is true in sport, work or life.

However this should not take anything away from those whose aspirations and opportunities may take them in a different direction. There is nothing wrong or “not in the spirit of things” to want to be faster and stronger.

THERE ARE ONLY THREE STEPS ON THE PODIUM

Not everyone aspires to be on the top step on a podium.

Performance management is about creating the opportunities to be better at what you value as being important. That can be as an athlete, coach, boss, mother, brother, or friend. It can be on the sports field, at work, in the garden or in the tranquillity of your own mind.

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organisation I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.

Source: Adapt Consulting Blog

WHAT TYPE OF ORGANISATION DO YOU WANT TO DEVELOP?

This blog isn’t a sales pitch and does not offer a clear and unambiguous solution to all your organisational woes. Instead it is a pick-n-mix of thoughts and experiences that may be useful and could be challenged – I welcome both debate and feedback, it’s where the learning really begins.

ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

I have recently been asked about OD. However so many people have so many different ideas of what Organisational Development the first challenge is to ask what we understand by the term. A quick reference to wiki and the following is suggested.

Organization development (OD) is a field of research, theory and practice dedicated to expanding the knowledge and effectiveness of people to accomplish more successful organizational change and performance

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organization_development

All sounds pretty good stuff to have in any organisation doesn’t it. Indeed we might hope that this is business-as-usual and that an Organisational Development Programme or Consultant should not be required to deliver this.

Hold this thought, I’ll come back to it later.

PEOPLE AND PROCESS

Some businesses are very prescriptive and follow set processes and procedures. Manufacturing would be a good example. Many product based businesses are also processes and procedures based with the end-product (a BMW, iPad or McDonalds Burger) being the product produced as a result of processes and procedures.

Some businesses are less prescriptive and allow greater autonomy for the people to do what they feel is right, to customise the services or respond to the wishes of the client. Typically we might stereotype these businesses as service and/or creative businesses.

This is clearly a simplification for the purpose of discussion, but you might suggest that the former would seek to develop employees who are methodical and compliant and the latter those who are self-starters, maverick and entrepreneurial.

It would be wrong to say you cannot have a mix of these skills, but when creating a culture and developing an organisation there will be some in the majority and some in the minority.

This will affect your bias towards control via processes and procedures or trust in people, who have the skills, understanding and knowledge to shape their efforts in pursuit of the organisational aims. This will affect recruitment and training, rewards and punishments, promotion and employee turn-over.

Hold this thought, I’ll come back to it later.

CONTRACT AND COVENANT

There was a good piece on BBC Radio 4 Today Programme [about 8am 23 July 2016] which talked about new policy for staff to self-certify their sickness and absence from work and the difference between their contract (the legal requirements and rules set between employer and employee) and their covenant (the trust, loyalty and commitment of each to each-other in support of mutual goals)

I know we all benefit from laws, rules, processes and procedures and programmes. They keep us safe on the roads, make the game fair, ensure consistency and quality and help us manage, monitor and progress towards our goals.

I also believe that people like to be trusted and to feel important, rather than be a cog in a big machine, which is what it can feel like in big or small bureaucracies where process appears to triumph over common sense.

So reflecting on the previous sections….

Is Organisational Development about knowledge and effectiveness of people through education on laws, rules, processes and procedures and programmes or by inspiring them to be self-starters, maverick and entrepreneurial in pursuit of the organisational aims.

Is Organisational Development about tightening the grip or loosening the grip, the balance between management (doing things right) and leadership (doing the right things).

PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM

Most businesses are very private about their Organisational Development needs and challenges. However Jersey’s Government is very public about theirs and presents some interesting scenarios for case studies and a good number of initiatives for consideration and evaluation.

See http://www.gov.je/News/Speeches/EDD/Pages/PublicSectorReform2014.aspx

•Modernisation
•What we have achieved so far
•1 – Lean programme
•2 – e-government
•3 – Workforce modernisation
•4 – Culture
•5 – Modern office
•Priorities for 2014

Some of the above initiatives have worked very well and some less well. Some have worked in other organisations better or worse than they have worked as part of Public Sector Reform. All of them merit consideration in the context or Organisational Development.

What Type Of Organisation Do You Want To Develop?

If you want to follow the Public Sector Reform the link below is a useful resource.
https://blog.gov.je/category/public-sector-reform/

CONTACT

If you are interested in any of the above and would like to contribute to the discussion by posting a comment, or meet with me to chat about your experiences and the issues and opportunities in your organisation I would be delighted to meet and buy the coffee and  croissants for an interesting conversation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tim Rogers is an AMPG Qualified Change Practitioner, a PRINCE2 Project Manager, with an MBA in Management Consultancy. Past projects have included the incorporation of Jersey Post Office, Operations Change and Sales Support for RBSI and NatWest and the integration and incorporation of Jersey Harbours and Airport. He is a tutor/lecturer for the Chartered Management Institute, a past curator for TEDx, Team manager for Jersey’s Triathlon Island Games Team and Performance Director for Jersey Rowing Club.

Source: Adapt Consulting Blog